NEWS RELEASE: Treating Sleep Apnoea Will Lead To Reduced Road Deaths Claims Sleeping Disorders Centre Founder Michael Oko

Sleeping Disorders Centre founder, Consultant ENT surgeon Michael Oko, will address senior international healthcare executives, public servants, and academics at the 1st International Road Traffic Accident Conference at the Rose Wood Hotel, Abu Dhabi, on 11th March 2014.

Mr Oko, a UK government advisor on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) strategy, will be speaking about the benefits of preventative treatment in reducing road traffic accidents, using the example of Lincolnshire UK, where traffic fatalities have fallen significantly since sleep apnoea testing and treatment began. Professor Ram Dhillon (Middlesex University and Sleeping Disorders Centre) will also address the conference on “Snoring & Preventable Deaths on the Road: A Common, medically treatable, and often missed cause of Road Traffic Accidents.”

Mr Oko said:

“It is suspected that about 20% of car accidents are sleep related and research has shown that sleepiness can impair driving more than drink! Indeed, patients with OSA have a 7-12 fold chance of a road traffic accident (RTA) compared to those who do not, and results in Lincolnshire have shown that treating the condition can reduce the accident rate dramatically. With the low level of awareness of sleep apnoea in the Middle East it’s no surprise that road accident rates in the Gulf region are high. In fact, road traffic accidents are the second major cause of death in the UAE and there are 3500 fatalities per year from RTAs in Saudi Arabia alone. I believe that the success I have had in Lincolnshire can be replicated in the Middle East by raising awareness of the condition, and forming long-term partnerships with local hospitals, doctors, and government departments.”

Mr Oko has already been very active in bringing this message to the healthcare community in the Middle East. For his work in this area Mr Oko was awarded the Middle East Hospital magazine award for excellence in respiratory care in 2011 and 2013.

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  1. Andrey’s avatar

    That seems to be true, though it would be impossible to force all snorers to cure sleap apnea. At least if there will no a law to do that.

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  2. M. Hussein’s avatar

    I have been on CPAP as a remedy to my OSA condition for the past four years. Now I have become completely dependent on this machine and can’t stop using it. Does this mean that I will remain for the rest of my life dependent on it? It’s very uncomfortable throughout the night besides negatively affecting my private marital life

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